So much basil…so little time

The Summer season is filled with so many wonderful foods that are fresh for such a short time. But canning, freezing, drying and preserving allow us to stretch the season to last the year around.

One sad exclusion to this bounty has always been fresh basil leaves. Once dried, all the volatile oils are lost, and it might as well be parsley. In my quest to find ways to extend the freshness life-span of my all-time favorite herbs, I began freezing it a few years back. I can never eat all I have, fresh, before it gets wilty and sad, so I have used this method for keeping it amazing so much longer.

The Basil Cube!

Begin with fresh, clean basil. It doesn’t matter how many you have. You are limited only by number of ice cube trays you can fit in your freezer. You can also make one single cube, if you only have a little bit to work with.

whole basil plants

whole basil plants

Strip all the leaves from the stems. All we are using is leaves for this project.

leaves only

leaves only

The cut or tear the leaves into small to tiny pieces and begin to cram them into a clean ice cube tray.

basil bits

basil bits

Then, pour enough water to cover the bits over the tray. I like to use filtered water, but I can’t imagine it makes much difference, really, what kind you use.

cover with water

cover with water

Then, pop the tray into the freezer for a minimum of 5 hours, but overnight might be best.

The next morning, you have perfectly portioned, ever-fresh basil leaves which can be used in sauces and soups all winter long. I store mine in a zip-loc bag so the flavors aren’t diminished by air, or shared among food that doesn’t need the pungency of basil.

basil cubes

basil cubes

Because the leaves are frozen, this method will not give you back fresh leaves, like you might need to make pesto, but it does retain the flavor of fresh basil. Because cooking removes a lot of the flavor, drop the cubes in to your sauce immediately before serving. Just let ’em melt, and give the pot a stir. Boom! Fresh basil flavor, any time of year!!! And, don’t forget to grow your own, to really Stick It To Monsanto.

An endless Summer to you all!

Cubist Coffee: or, Handcrafted Summer Mornings

Ahhh, Summertime! Where I live, it is very temperate and pleasant. But in many, many places it is just too darn hot! Especially for a hot beverage to start the day. So this Handcrafted Hack is in celebration of getting your caffeine, without having your eyes sweat. *It should be noted, before we even begin, as with so many handcrafted projects, this is not instant! The cubes will need to be frozen overnight (minimum of 8 hours. 12 is better) I saw a post on facebook about making coffee ice cubes, and decided to put the theory to the test. I decided to start sort of small, since it was an experiment. I brewed about 1/3 of a pot of very strong, lovely coffee.

start with strong coffee

start with strong coffee

Then, I used a clean, empty ice cube tray

clean tray

clean tray

I filled the tray pretty full, and let it sit on the counter for an hour or so, as I filled it hot. You could simply turn off the coffee pot and let it cool before you pour. Obviously, you don’t want to put anything hot into the freezer, as it puts all your frozen foods at risk of thawing.

cooling coffee

cooling coffee

Then, place the trays into the freezer, where they won’t be disturbed until the next day. Just a note, here, I stacked my 2 trays I made, and the coffee froze onto the bottom of the top tray, which, of course melted into dark coffee drips as I was taking it from the freezer, and using the cubes. There is a pretty significant potential for mess, here, so, maybe, don’t wear white while you participate in this process. The next morning, I pulled the cubes from the tray and placed them in my glass:

iced coffee on!

iced coffee on!

Now, because I was just having an “iced latte”, I simply added milk (cow’s milk, for this experiment, but, of course, you can use whatever you fancy), and was on my way. As the cubes have melted, the coffee is mixed into the milk. It has been a spectacular way to start the day.

Iced latte!

Iced latte!

It should be noted that this concoction could just as easily be a mocha (add chocolate syrup), or a flavored latte (add syrup) or a blended drink (drop the lot in a blender and whirl). The thickness of the blended drink is the coffee cubes, which do not water down a blended or on the “rocks” coffee drink. And, let’s don’t miss the obvious indications for both alcoholic additions and ice cream! I believe this idea could easily b adapted to a bunch of other applications, such as tea-cubes for your iced tea (in any flavor, or even herbal); freezing juice cubes, or adding your favorite protein/diet/supplement powder to the mix. So, today’s tutorial not only saves a fortune in coffee house prices, but sticks it to both Monsanto and Starbucks! Double bonus for Awesome America!

Going Bananas

Ok, so here is the finished banana chip project. It went splendidly to plan. But I did make a minor modification in the plan:

done!

done!

I started the project dehydrating the banana slices on 125 degrees, but found, before I went to bed, they were drying out faster than I anticipated. So I turned the temperature back to 115. I had my husband turn the machine off at 7am, when he gets up, to complete a 12 hour cycle.

The chips were perfectly dried. Chewy, flavorful and lovely.

Just a note as to quantity- I expected my 2 large bunches to become a quart mason jar of dried chips, but they ended up being more like 2!

finished product

finished product

I am told that if you spray a fine mist of lemon juice over the slices they will stay truer in color. But I couldn’t be bothered. The color of them doesn’t put me off at all. If it bothers you, lemon juice is an option.

Thinking ahead to fruit leather, I am thinking of using the applesauce I canned in the Fall, and a puree of some fruit I have in the freezer. I have raspberries and blackberries, so I am excited for the future of healthy snacking!!! Take that BigFood!!!!!!

That’s it for today. It’s Day 5 of a 10 day run at my day job, so I will be along when I have time and inspiration.  Be well. Handcraft. Be awesome America! Stick It To Monsanto!

It’s ALIVE!

Greetings, all and sundry!

I am positive, by now, you have decided I died of eating nothing but handcrafted food. Or, worse, fell off the Handcrafted wagon, and was lost in a mire of Monsanto.

But, NO! I just had a lot of other stuff going on in my life.

Still, I am back in the saddle, and am ready to share some of the cool stuff I am doing and learning, lately. But first, the past year… I have still not mastered cheese . This saddens me, but I remain hopeful that one day I will get it.  I am still entirely sold on handcrafted toothpaste, and still use my own every day. It has helped me with a lot of the problems I was beginning to have with my aging teeth. I am not as keen on long-term use of the coconut oil and baking soda deodorant, and have eliminated the baking soda because it caused me to have some pH issues. No big deal, but after a month or so, my skin reacted and I didn’t like it. If I took a break, I could use it for about another month, but, ultimately, it happened again, anyway. So, I use just plain coconut oil most days and regular deodorant for “potentially sweaty” days.

I am still making my own sauces and soups and smoothies and croutons and bread. But not so much diligence on crackers and granola  . I am getting back in the swing of things, again, though, so I expect to have better reports very soon.

So, as to new stuff, I just got a brand new, giant food dehydrator- 10 racks all with mesh liners and the fruit leather trays, for $15!!!  🙂  I have been waiting for ages for this to manifest in my life! I have employed many other preservation methods, but have felt I have been missing a vital aspect of pantry-filling without it.

I wanted to get started immediately (of course!) so I went shopping for one of my favorite dried fruit items, bananas. They are easy, and practically instant, prep-wise. My shop had organic bananas for sale for $0.10 more than the regular, so I splurged for the good ones.

All I did was slice the bananas as consistently as I could, and pop them in a single layer on the tray. I started 4 full trays, from 2 bunches of bananas.

sliced bananas in the dehydrator

sliced bananas in the dehydrator

Then I turned on the machine (125 degrees) and will now wait the 12 hours to check for doneness. I like mine a bit “leathery”.

 

Tomorrow, I will be back with the finished product, which I will store in a mason jar with tight fitting lid.

Fruit snacks are as simple as that. Later, I am going to make fruit leather with apples and raspberries (because red is my favorite flavor!).  Take that, Big Food!!!

Thanks for tuning in, my precious blueberries! I look forward to a busy, prosperous and entirely handcrafted Summer!!!!

Stocking the Pantry: Canned Peaches

Today’s surprise trip to the Farmer’s Market resulted in some gorgeous peaches, and since I have been dying to can some this year, I decided to dedicate these to this purpose.

Right off the bat, I want to say that this is possible because I have finally embraced the notion of “No such thing as too small a batch” to bother with. I know women who won’t even heat a kettle of water unless they are working with 20 pounds or more of produce, but if I waited to can until I had 20 pounds of something I would have a pretty sparsely populated pantry. I am employing some water-saving tactics here, though, and I will include these instructions as I go.

Start, of course, with ripe, unblemished fresh fruit. A bump or 2 is ok, but watch for overripe fruit with lots of soft spots. The flavor just isn’t there, and the will go to mush in the canner, even with a cold pack.

fresh peaches

fresh peaches

Before you begin, make a sugar syrup (approximately 2 cups of sugar in 4 or so cups of water). Boil the syrup for at least 10 minutes. Longer if you like a heavy syrup (the water cooks away and leaves a thicker, more concentrated, sugary syrup. I like mine a bit lighter).

Put all the jars you may need to contain the fruit in a canning kettle and boil them off to sterilize. Once the water is boiling, this same kettle can be used to blanch the peaches to make them easier to peel. Always peel your peaches (or tomatoes) before canning. The skin just gets weird and rather undesirable.

see that peach in there?

see that peach in there?

Drop the peaches into the boiling water and let them bob around (or sink) for about 3-5 minutes. Fish one out and test for peelablility. The skin should come away easily as the immediate flesh begins to cook from being in the boiling water and allows the skin to release. Now, some varieties of peaches peel more readily than others, and I am not going to lie; some are an absolute pain in the arse. Those just have to be peeled more like a raw potato, removing a bit of the flesh at the same time. I pray you find the easiest peeling varieties at a Farmer’s Market near you. I had some of each to work with, today. Always ask when you buy them to avoid varieties whose skin clings.

skin coming away easily after blanching

skin coming away easily after blanching

Once blanched, peel them. Then, either halve or slice the fruit for packing. Wide mouth jars work the best for peaches, but if they are slices, regular mouth ones will work,too.

quartered peaches

quartered peaches

Then cold pack the fruit into the sterilized jars. You can allow them to settle down, but don’t “cram” as much in as will fit. You will need to leave plenty of head space at the top of the jars to allow for expansion.

cold pack

cold pack

Pour syrup over fruit, leaving the appropriate head space, and wipe the edges of the jars. Firmly tighten lids and rings and place in the still boiling water. For this mission, we have used only 1 kettle of water for sterilizing jars, blanching fruit and water bath canning the jars. From a rolling boil, begin timing for 20 minutes.

back into the same kettle

back into the same kettle

When your timer goes off, remove the jars from the water bath and place them on a towel on the counter, where they can rest overnight or until cool.

done!

done!

You will want to think about how you will use them, later, to determine what size jars to use. If you have a small family, you may want to use pints, rather than quarts. This batch, I did one quart, to use for peach cobbler, and 2 pints to use for crepes with peaches (which is my husband’s favorite), during the winter. If you have a large family, you may want to strictly can quarts.

These beautiful jars of late-Summery goodness will be waiting for you in Winter, when it feels like Summer may never come again. There are no preservatives or chemicals and yet they are perfectly safe to use within one year of canning them.

There is no better way to stick it to Monsanto than choosing healthy organic produce in season and canning it for later. Take that BigFood!

Now that’s Awesome America at work!!!

HomeGrown Food Just Got Real: Baby chicks

At some point in a quest to create a more healthy, wholesome lifestyle one realizes that in order to eat fresh food, you have to grow it yourself. And while veggies and fruit lend themselves to a rather easy fix, meat and other protein-rich foods are a bit more complicated.

My flock is strictly for eggs, rather than meat, but I go in to this process with my eyes open. All of these birds will one day end up as “and dumplings”. But for these little peeps, that day is many years from now.

If you have ever considered keeping hens, this tutorial may be helpful to you.

This is the diary of 9 laying hens from their 2nd day of life, on. Each of these chicks was hatched yesterday, has been shipped overnight to the feed store and then picked up by me and driven the 45 miles to my house. A feed store is a great place to buy chicks, as you get to have a look at them before you buy them, thus ensuring a healthy flock from the beginning. When you buy them via the internet, straight from the hatchery, you don’t get that option.

peep!

peep!

Before you even order chicks there are many things you need to have in place. A brooder- the containment field they will live in for their first few to several weeks of life. It needs to have sufficient room for the number of chicks you will be buying.  I use an old reptile aquarium.

aquarium brooder with light housing

aquarium brooder with light housing

Also, you will need an overhead heat source. Many people recommend a 250 watt bulb, which is expensive both to buy (around $11) and to run, round the clock for aprox. 6 weeks. I use a soft white 150 watt bulb in a housing to direct the heat downward. It cost $4.19. Each week the chicks will need less heat, so having a clamp-on light housing is a great option for moving it higher as they get bigger and need less heat. There should also be a warm side and a less warm side, so they can escape from the heat if they get too warm. I keep my feed and water on the opposite side of the brooder from the heat source so there is a wide variety of temperature options.

the warm side

the warm side

You will need feed and a feeder. I have the screw-on type that goes with a mason jar. I use a medicated feed when buying hatchery chicks and brooding them, myself in a box. Their immune systems have absolutely nothing to draw from and they will be vulnerable to everything in these first weeks of life. (when I am using a broody hen to hatch chicks, I let them eat the same All Purpose Poultry feed I feed to the rest of the flock… but broodies are a whole different experience, and I am assuming you don’t have a broody hen handy)

chick feeder

chick feeder

baby food

baby food

They will also need a waterer. I buy the plastic screw-on bottoms that can be used with any regular-mouth glass mason jar. This one was about $3.

waterer

waterer

There will also need to be some sort of litter in the brooder. Chicks can’t be left to walk on a smooth surface or it can damage their legs due to slipping around. I use pine shavings (NOT CEDAR! Cedar bedding is toxic to chicks). I also keep that bedding in a huge garbage bag, in the room I am brooding the chicks. Keeping everything handy to where you are using it is easiest and best.

brooder fluff

brooder fluff

I also keep a bucket in the brooder room so I can easily clean out soiled or wet litter quickly. I later dump that soiled litter on my raspberry canes for overwintering.

Once the brooder is set up, you will need some chicks!

chicks, man

chicks, man

Place the box into the brooder and then take the chicks out. They will likely congregate under the lamp until they warm up, but then will begin to move about inside the open space of the brooder. Be sure they each know where food and water is, taking the time to dip each one’s beak into the water so they will know where to find it. It only takes a second and you only have to do it once. Tap on the food with your finger and this will call them to it. It is how hens teach the chicks what to eat, and where the food is.

Then, cover your brooder, entirely with a screen, and some sort of weight (I use a piece of plywood and a couple of big fat books). The screen should allow the heat to escape but the chicks won’t be able to launch themselves out. It should also provide protection from other animals in the household, such as curious cats.

old window screen

old window screen

Sit back and watch the little peeps explore their new environment. If they pile up together under the light, they may be too cold. If they lay stretched out and panting, they are too hot. You will be able to tell a lot about how they are feeling by their behavior, so spend some time just watching them every day.

If you don’t enjoy cleaning pine shavings out of the water 100 times per day, place the waterer up on an overturned plant saucer or up on a short piece of 2×4 wood. Just an inch above the shavings will help keep a LOT of it out. But, do know you will probably have to fish out shavings pretty often, anyway.

The babies will need to be moved to their permanent coop within a month to 6 weeks, so don’t wait until you have them installed in your spare bedroom to start thinking about your coop. The wise farmer has that sorted out well in advance of bringing home the day old chicks. If your coop is entirely secure of predators you can actually brood them out in the coop, just hang the light low enough that it can provide the warmth they need, and gradually raise it as they feather out. Once they are fully feathered (around 4-6 weeks) they won’t need a heat source at all. As day-olds they need temperatures around 95 degrees and each week that number can be lowered by about 5 degrees or so. No need to have a thermometer, unless you just want to. You will be able to tell be their behavior if they are comfortable or not.

The brooder room will be dusty, so keep that in mind. Many people use a garage or basement for their brooding, and this is prudent if you don’t want chick dust and pine shavings all over the spare bedroom carpet (like I have 🙂 ).

There is a TON of helpful advice on Backyard Chickens and forums where you can ask a question or 2 and get answers from real chicken people. Keep in mind that every single person who has ever seen a chicken has a differing opinion on absolutely every aspect, and that will be evident the instant people begin chiming in with answers. The best thing to do is educate yourself and then choose your own strategy. Get to know some people who are raising chickens and speak to them about their strategies.

The most important thing is, make sure you have enough space for the number of birds you intend to keep, and have fun with it! Watching Chicken TV is the most entertaining activity you can imagine. Very theraputic, and absolutely hilarious!

Plus, a few months after these puff-balls come in to your life, they start giving back in the form of the freshest, healthiest eggs on the planet. The ones YOUR hens laid.

Now that is how you create a return to Awesome America and give Monsanto and BigFood a big black eye!!!

Miss Poppy

Miss Poppy

Stocking the Pantry: Apple Pie Filling

pie filling!

pie filling!

One of my many projects, this Summer, has been preparing the pantry for the Autumn and Winter months. Without these preparations,  in order to enjoy fruits and veggies, I would have to choose a commercially prepared product of dubious origin and treatment. This way, I have my very own treasures, prepared from “scratch” awaiting my need for them all Season long!

Today’s project description is for Apple Pie Filling.

I began with the yellow transparent tree in my back garden. Known for their soft texture and tendency toward graininess, once these apples are ripe their only real function is applesauce and apple butter, which I have made and enjoyed many times. But this year, I decided to pick them a day or 2 before being entirely ripe. The texture remained firm and the flavor, amazing!

apple tree

apple tree

The only safe apple seems to be grown organically, or as they are in my neck of the woods, “grown by Nature”- never watered, sprayed, fertilized by humans at all. If you can find an apple tree then, by all means, use those apples. If not, buy the good stuff and use those.

yellow transparent apple

yellow transparent apple

Pick only the number of apples you plan to use immediately. Peel, core and slice apples into a bowl of water with added lemon juice, to prevent a certain amount of browning (some is obviously inevitable, but no worries. Cinnamon and nutmeg are brown, too).

apple prep

apple prep

Place apple slices into a large saucepan or stock pot, and coat with a liberal dusting of corn starch. I am not going to give amounts, because that all depends on the amount of apples you begin with. Add sugar (the amount also depends on number and sweetness of apples), ground cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, allspice, cardamom, ginger, and/or whatever spices you like in your apple pie. Hand blend these ingredients well, until apples are uniformly coated with the mixture.

apple, spice, starch mixture

apple, spice, starch mixture

Then, on medium heat, begin to cook the apples down. The length of time this will take is entirely dependent on the type and ripeness of apples. With my yellow transparents, it took about 10 minutes or so. Firmer apple varieties will take longer. The goal is to cook them until they are about halfway as cooked as you would like them when the pie is finished baking. Taste the mixture throughout the process. Nothing in it will hurt you, “raw”, so don’t be afraid to taste all along the way. To ensure enough sugar (if you accidentally add to much, give it a squeeze of lemon juice to balance), to create optimal spice balance, to detect doneness, all can be done with tasting. Be sure you like it before you go further!!!

pie filling!

pie filling!

Then, pack the mixture into sterilized glass jars. To sterilize, you can run them through a dishwasher and heat dry them, you can boil them seperately, in a canning pot, or you can fill them with boiling water from a kettle and leave them full until the apples are ready.

Then, place the jars, tightly lidded, into a water batch canner, and adjust water level to 2 inches or so above the tops of the jars. Bring the water to boiling and begin timing 25 minutes from rolling boil.

When they have been processed, remove them to a towel on the counter and allow to sit overnight, undisturbed. Their seals should begin “popping” almost immediately.

Next morning, the ones whose lids are sealed can be removed to the pantry. If the seal isn’t right, place it in the fridge and use it within one week.

When it is time to make pie, the jar can be emptied into an unbaked pie crust, and baked at 350 degrees. Lattice designs and other cut-outs are popular in 2-crust pies. But my favorite apple pie is crumb-y! (this can also be dumped directly into greased pan and topped to make apple crisp)

Apple Pie Crumbs:

1 stick of butter, softened a little (not squishy)

1/2 to 3/4 cup of  packed brown sugar

1/2 cup white sugar

1 tsp. cinnamon

1/2 tsp nutmeg

1/4 tsp ground cloves, ginger, cardamom, allspice (each)

Using your hands, squish it all together until the mixture will stick together when you make a fist around it, but also breaks up easily into course crumbs when you break it apart.

Pour this crumb-y mixture over the pie filling and bake as usual for pie or crisp.

The convenience of having apple pie filling already made when I am ready to throw a quick pie or crumble together is going to be amazing! The same process can be achieved with many other types of fruit, so don’t hesitate to experiment! Holiday baking can be quick and easy if you are prepared!!!

Handcrafted Holiday Desserts, quick and delicious! Take that BigFood. Stick it to Monsanto with America’s most fond symbol of Home; Apple Pie!!!

 

Dandelion Coconut Muscle Relief Oil

This year, I have put no energy, whatever, into ridding my space of dandelions. In fact, I have put them to work for me!

This kitchen magic: Dandelion Coconut Muscle Rub

Wonderful for undoing, when you have overdone it.

It requires:

  • A glass canning jar including lid and ring, larger than total volume of finished product
  • liquified coconut oil
  • a large handful of flowering dandelion tops
  • A sunny afternoon window sill, daily for 2 weeks

That’s it.

Place the dandelion flowers in the bottom of the sterile, entirely dry jar.

flowers! not weeds.

flowers! not weeds.

 

Pour the oil over the flowers to entirely cover.

shake daily, while a liquid.

shake daily, while a liquid.

Place lid and ring on jar and firmly tighten.

Place jar in the sunny window.

solid coconut oil and dandelions

solid coconut oil and dandelions

 

The oil with solidify when it isn’t 76 degrees, so it needs to reach that temperature every day, and be shaken gently. This is completely easy if it can “live” in a western or southern window in the Summer, because the sun does the warming. If the weather doesn’t cooperate, the jar can be placed in a shallow pan of water and gently warmed, but this is definitely more work and dedication.

Shake daily for 2 weeks and strain.

wamr, strained oil

warm, strained oil

finished product

finished product

The finished product is a wonderful oil rub for sore muscles as is, and would make an ideal additive to beeswax for a heavier salve.

 

Frozen Yogurt

After such rousing success, yesterday, with the Double Vanilla ice cream, I decided to make some frozen yogurt!

I took 1 quart undrained homemade yogurt and 1/2 a cup of homemade low-sugar raspberry jam, and popped it in the ice cream maker. I wasn’t sure how it would freeze, but it was perfect!

When I cured it in the freezer, however, if froze solid. It is now a delicious raspberry yogurt brick.

frozen yogurt

frozen yogurt

So I got to thinking, wouldn’t this make the most amazing popcicles?! So the next time I make it, I will be curing it in plastic popcicle molds and enjoying an individual serving pop.

Nothing could be simpler! Delicious, entirely homemade and free of preservatives and artificial anything! Also, way cheaper than store-bought and can be flavored with anything you like!

Awesome America at work, sticking it to Monsanto, BigFood and fake treats!

We all scream for ICE CREAM!!!!

Today’s experiment in the kitchen, Double Vanilla ice cream.

While I cannot honestly say this has been “hand”crafted (because the ice cream maker did all the work) it is homemade, and that is why I feel justified in including it, here.

To begin, you will need an ice cream maker (either hand crank or electric. I bore easily, so I am using an electric. So sue me.) a whisk, a mixing bowl,and a big rubber spatula.

For ingredients and implementation, you will need 1 bag of ice and a box of rock or ice cream salt. Also:

  • 3/4 cup sugar (or sweetener of your choice)
  • 1 pint heavy cream
  • 1 pint milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2 of one vanilla bean
  • 1/2 tsp table salt

Begin by slicing the vanilla bean lengthwise through only the top layer of skin. Scrape all the teeny, oily seeds into a 2 qt mixing bowl. They are kind of a mess, but sooooo worth the end result. Then add all other ingredients to the bowl and mix them together thoroughly.

Place the mixture into the “can” of the ice cream maker and chill in the fridge for at least half an hour.

Then, assemble the ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s directions. Add ice and rock salt in alternating layers around the can. Note: the smaller the ice cubes and the less salt used, the slower the churn, and thus, the finer the grain of ice cream product.

salt

salt

It is essential that your mixture fill no more than half the available volume in your can, as the mixture will expand to roughly double when complete.

Plug it in, or begin churning. Add ice, water or salt, as needed, as indicated by the directions for your machine. Keep the ice level up to the top to insure complete freezing.

I found that the addition of table salt kept the mixture from freezing “solid”. Not to worry. It is a necessary foil for the sweetness of the ice cream and makes a delicious difference to the finished product.

When the machine stops, or 50 minutes of freezing time has elapsed, turn out the ice cream into a freezer container, taking care to scrape all the yummy deliciousness from the paddle into your bowl or back into the can. It is ready to eat at this stage, but will have a consistency more like soft-serve. For a harder product, cure the ice cream in the freezer for at least an hour (2-3 is better).

Voila! The most delicious ice cream EVAH, with absolutely no carageenen, high fructose corn syrup or FD&C yellow #5. Ice cream will last up to one week in the freezer. But seriously, no it won’t!

Take that BigFood! What a delicious way to Stick-It-To-Monsanto. This mixture cost approximately half what a premium ice cream cost me to buy, and is all natural and contains no preservatives.

Now that is what I call some Summertime Awesome America!!!